Nate Dogg Passes Away at age 41 find out @smarterhiphop



Singer Nate Dogg dies at 41
Hip-hop lost another great one as singer, Nate Dogg died last night at the age of 41. The cause of death has yet to be determined but Nate did suffer from a stroke in 2008.
Nathaniel Dwayne Hale crooned his way in our hearts with a distinct sound and gangsta melodies in the early 90’s.
He added the right notes to songs like Warren G’s “Regulate”and Snoop Dogg’s “Ain’t No Fun” and provided memorable hooks to many of the DeathRow records in that era.
The Long Beach native began in the group 213 with Snoop and Warren and throughout his career he lent his vocals to stars including Eminem, 50 Cent, The Game, Ludacris, Tupac and Dr. Dre.
He was nominated for four Grammys for collaborations and the most successful of his four solo albums wasMusic & Me.
Snoop Dogg tweeted about his homie, “We lost a true legend n hip hop n rnb. One of my best friends n a brother to me since 1986 when I was a sophomore at poly high where we met.
I miss u cuzz I am so sad but so happy I got to grow up wit u and I will c u again n heaven cuz u know d slogan.”
50 Cent also posted words on Twitter, “I just landed nate dog is dead damn. GOD BLESS HIM R.I.P he meant a lot to west coast hiphop. Iv always been a fan of it.”
“There is a certain void in hip hop’s heart that can never be filled.Glad we got to make history together. RT @SnoopDogg: RIP NATE DOGG,” Ludacris posted.
What’s your favorite Nate Dogg chorus/song?

10,000 Dead in Japan fears of nuclear meltdowns! find out @smarterhiphop

              SENDAI, Japan – The estimated death toll from Japan’s disasters climbed past 10,000 Sunday as authorities raced to combat the threat of multiple nuclear reactor meltdowns and hundreds of thousands of people struggled to find food and water. The prime minister said it was the nation’s worst crisis since World War II.
Nuclear plant operators worked frantically to try to keep temperatures down in several reactors crippled by the earthquake and tsunami, wrecking at least two by dumping sea water into them in last-ditch efforts to avoid meltdowns. Officials warned of a second explosion but said it would not pose a health threat.
Near-freezing temperatures compounded the misery of survivors along hundreds of miles (kilometers) of the northeastern coast battered by the tsunami that smashed inland with breathtaking fury. Rescuers pulled bodies from mud-covered jumbles of wrecked houses, shattered tree trunks, twisted cars and tangled power lines while survivors examined the ruined remains.
One rare bit of good news was the rescue of a 60-year-old man swept away by the tsunami who clung to the roof of his house for two days until a military vessel spotted him waving a red cloth about 10 miles (15 kilometers) offshore.
The death toll surged because of a report from Miyagi, one of the three hardest hit states. The police chief told disaster relief officials more than 10,000 people were killed, police spokesman Go Sugawara told The Associated Press. That was an estimate — only 400 people have been confirmed dead in Miyagi, which has a population of 2.3 million.
According to officials, more than 1,800 people were confirmed dead — including 200 people whose bodies were found Sunday along the coast — and more than 1,400 were missing in Friday’s disasters. Another 1,900 were injured.
For Japan, one of the world’s leading economies with ultramodern infrastructure, the disasters plunged ordinary life into nearly unimaginable deprivation.
Hundreds of thousands of hungry survivors huddled in darkened emergency centers that were cut off from rescuers, aid and electricity. At least 1.4 million households had gone without water since the quake struck and some 1.9 million households were without electricity.
While the government doubled the number of soldiers deployed in the aid effort to 100,000 and sent 120,000 blankets, 120,000 bottles of water and 29,000 gallons (110,000 liters) of gasoline plus food to the affected areas, Prime Minister Naoto Kan said electricity would take days to restore. In the meantime, he said, electricity would be rationed with rolling blackouts to several cities, including Tokyo.
“This is Japan’s most severe crisis since the war ended 65 years ago,” Kan told reporters, adding that Japan’s future would be decided by its response.
In Rikuzentakata, a port city of over 20,000 virtually wiped out by the tsunami, Etsuko Koyama escaped the water rushing through the third floor of her home but lost her grip on her daughter’s hand and has not found her.
“I haven’t given up hope yet,” Koyama told public broadcaster NHK, wiping tears from her eyes. “I saved myself, but I couldn’t save my daughter.”
A young man described what ran through his mind before he escaped in a separate rescue. “I thought to myself, ah, this is how I will die,” Tatsuro Ishikawa, his face bruised and cut, told NHK as he sat in striped hospital pajamas.
Japanese officials raised their estimate Sunday of the quake’s magnitude to 9.0, a notch above the U.S. Geological Survey’s reading of 8.9. Either way, it was the strongest quake ever recorded in Japan, which lies on a seismically active arc. A volcano on the southern island of Kyushu — hundreds of miles (kilometers) from the quake’ epicenter — also resumed spewing ash and rock Sunday after a couple of quiet weeks, Japan’s weather agency said.
Dozens of countries have offered assistance. Two U.S. aircraft carrier groups were off Japan’s coast and ready to help. Helicopters were flying from one of the carriers, the USS Ronald Reagan, delivering food and water in Miyagi.
Two other U.S. rescue teams of 72 personnel each and rescue dogs arrived Sunday, as did a five-dog team from Singapore.
Still, large areas of the countryside remained surrounded by water and unreachable. Fuel stations were closed, though at some, cars waited in lines hundreds of vehicles long.
The United States and a several countries in Europe urged their citizens to avoid travel to Japan. France took the added step of suggesting people leave Tokyo in case radiation reached the city.
Community after community traced the vast extent of the devastation.
In the town of Minamisanrikucho, 10,000 people — nearly two-thirds of the population — have not been heard from since the tsunami wiped it out, a government spokesman said. NHK showed only a couple concrete structures still standing, and the bottom three floors of those buildings gutted. One of the few standing was a hospital, and a worker told NHK that hospital staff rescued about a third of the patients.
In the hard-hit port city of Sendai, firefighters with wooden picks dug through a devastated neighborhood. One of them yelled: “A corpse.” Inside a house, he had found the body of a gray-haired woman under a blanket.
A few minutes later, the firefighters spotted another — that of a man in black fleece jacket and pants, crumpled in a partial fetal position at the bottom of a wooden stairwell. From outside, while the top of the house seemed almost untouched, the first floor where the body was had been inundated. A minivan lay embedded in one outer wall, which had been ripped away, pulverized beside a mangled bicycle.
The man’s neighbor, 24-year-old Ayumi Osuga, dug through the remains of her own house, her white mittens covered by dark mud.
Osuga said she had been practicing origami, the Japanese art of folding paper into figures, with her three children when the quake stuck. She recalled her husband’s shouted warning from outside: “‘GET OUT OF THERE NOW!'”
She gathered her children — aged 2 to 6 — and fled in her car to higher ground with her husband. They spent the night in a hilltop home belonging to her husband’s family about 12 miles (20 kilometers) away.
“My family, my children. We are lucky to be alive,” she said.
“I have come to realize what is important in life,” Osuga said, nervously flicking ashes from a cigarette onto the rubble at her feet as a giant column of black smoke billowed in the distance.
As night fell and temperatures dropped to freezing in Sendai, people who had slept in underpasses or offices the past two nights gathered for warmth in community centers, schools and City Hall.

At a large refinery on the outskirts of the city, 100-foot (30-meter) -high bright orange flames rose in the air, spitting out dark plumes of smoke. The facility has been burning since Friday. The fire’s roar could be heard from afar. Smoke burned the eyes and throat, and a gaseous stench hung in the air.

In the small town of Tagajo, also near Sendai, dazed residents roamed streets cluttered with smashed cars, broken homes and twisted metal.
Residents said the water surged in and quickly rose higher than the first floor of buildings. At Sengen General Hospital, the staff worked feverishly to haul bedridden patients up the stairs one at a time. With the halls now dark, those who can leave have gone to the local community center.
“There is still no water or power, and we’ve got some very sick people in here,” said hospital official Ikuro Matsumoto.
Police cars drove slowly through the town and warned residents through loudspeakers to seek higher ground, but most simply stood by and watched them pass.
In the town of Iwaki, there was no electricity, stores were closed and residents left as food and fuel supplies dwindled. Local police took in about 90 people and gave them blankets and rice balls, but there was no sign of government or military aid trucks.
___
Todd Pitman reported from Sendai. Associated Press writers Eric Talmadge and Kelly Olsen in Koriyama and Malcolm J. Foster, Mari Yamaguchi, Tomoko A. Hosaka and Shino Yuasa in Tokyo contributed to this report.

all donations will go to red cross to help earthquake victims!

100 After Shocks in Japan cause nuclear plant to leak Radiation! find out @smarterhiphop

                                                                                          

Tokyo, March 12 (DPA) The number of people feared dead or missing after Japan was hit by an earthquake and tsunami could top 1,600, news reports said Saturday, as concern rose over damaged nuclear reactors.
Japan was assessing the devastation a day after the 8.9-magnitude quake and 10-metre high tsunami rocked the north-eastern part of the country Friday.
The toll would probably be well over 1,000, said Yukio Edano, the chief cabinet secretary.
‘This is the largest earthquake since the Meiji Era, and it is believed that more than 1,000 people have lost their lives,’ he said.
Authorities had recovered hundreds of bodies, with more than 1,000 people still missing and many injured, news reports said, the authorities warned of further tsunamis and aftershocks.

                              
              
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Russia’s to assist Japan with aftermath major earthquake and tsunami find out @smartehiphop

President Dmitry Medvedev ordered Russia’s Emergencies Ministry to gear up to assist Japan in dealing with the aftermath of the major earthquake and tsunami that pounded the Asian country.
The ministry said that it was ready to provide all necessary aid required at the moment.
Medvedev was speaking at a Friday session of the State Council dedicated to the development of Russia’s energy industry. When news of the Japanese earthquake broke, the leader of the Russian state said that his nation was ready to help its neighbors and that a state of emergency had already been declared. Medvedev ordered all agencies to deal with the possible consequences on Russian territory as well. “On our Kuril Islands, in the Sakhalin region, on our land, we also need to take all of the necessary measures to prevent damage and the loss of human lives,” he said.
“Our consolidation should be at its highest today. I am instructing the emergency situations minister to submit these assistance-related suggestions to me for confirmation,” President Medvedev said.

The Emergencies Ministry reported it that was ready to carry out the presidential order. “Should Tokyo appeal, including via the United Nations, Russia will be ready to provide the necessary humanitarian aid to Japan,” Russian news agency Interfax quoted the Emergencies Ministry source as saying on Friday.
Friday’s earthquake is the biggest to hit Japan in 140 years, unleashing a 10-meter high tsunami that barreled through the country’s Pacific coast. The disaster killed at least 40 people and washed away hundreds of buildings and structures.
Dmitry Medvedev’s offer of help came during the period of strained relations between Moscow and Tokyo, caused by a long-lasting dispute over several islands in Russia’s Far East.
Japan lost the islands, the Kurils, to Russia after the Second World War, but ambiguities in the treaty allowed Japan to claim that the four islands in the archipelago as its territory. Since Russia said that the results of the post-war agreements must not be revised, the two countries have not signed a peace treaty to this day.
Russia’s president paid a visit to the Kurils at the end of October and the move sparked official protest in Japan along with a number of public rallies. Russia responded by announcing plans to boost its military presence in the region.

all donations will go to red cross to help earthquake victims!

Powerful earthquakes hits Japan!!! find out @smarterhiphop

Powerful earthquakes hit Japan

A series of massive earthquakes have struck north-east Japan, unleashing a 10-metre tsunami that swept buildings, vehicles, crops and debris across swaths of farmland.

The first 8.9 magnitude shock is said to be the biggest to have hit Japan in 140 years, rocking buildings 235 miles (380km) away in Tokyo and sparking fires.
At least five people are known to have died, but amid widespread reports of landslides, floods, collapsed buildings and fires, the death toll is expected to rise.
The quake hit at 2.46pm (5.45am GMT), about 6 miles below sea level and 78 miles off the east coast. It was swiftly followed by five powerful aftershocks of up to 7.1 magnitude. In Tokyo people screamed and grabbed each other’s hands as the quake struck. The shock was so powerful it was felt as far away as Beijing.

Television footage showed a 4-metre tsunami sweeping over embankments in Sendai city, bearing cars and houses – some on fire – across farmland, before reversing course and carrying them out to sea. Public broadcaster NHK showed images of a large ship ramming into a breakwater in Kennuma city, Miyagi prefecture.

The quake and tsunami halted air and rail services across large parts of the country. Eight military planes were scrambled to survey the damage as areas along Japan’s entire Pacific coast braced for aftershocks and the possibility of more tsunami.

The Pacific tsunami warning centre in Hawaii said a warning was in effect for Japan, Russia, Marcus Island and the Northern Marianas. Tsunami watches have been issued for Guam, Taiwan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Hawaii and the entire western coast of the US and Canada, from the Mexican border to Chignik Bay in Alaska.

The Japanese prime minister, Naoto Kan, promised a quick response as he called an emergency cabinet meeting.

“The earthquake has caused major damage in broad areas in northern Japan,” Kan said during an emergency news conference. “Some of the nuclear power plant in the region have automatically shut down, but there is no leakage of radioactive materials to the environment.”

The shutdown left 4m homes in and around Tokyo without power.

Kan said he had set up an emergency taskforce to co-ordinate the rescue effort.

“The government will make an all-out effort to ensure the safety of all the people and contain the damage to the minimum,” he said.

Junichi Sawada, an official with Japan’s fire and disaster management agency, said: “This is a rare, major quake, and damages could quickly rise by the minute.”

Fire department officials in Osaki, Miyagi prefecture, said at least 20 people had been injured by falling objects, with some reportedly trapped under debris. At least 10 people were injured when part of a hall roof collapsed in Tokyo, the metropolitan police department said.

All flights were grounded immediately after the quake while officials checked for runway damage. Strong tremors were felt in Tokyo about 30 minutes after the quake. Newsreaders in the capital wore helmets as they gave updates, while office workers rushed out of buildings and on to the streets for safety.

Osamu Akiya, 46, was working at his Tokyo office when the quake hit, sending bookshelves and other items flying and opening up cracks in the wall.

“I’ve been through many earthquakes, but I’ve never felt anything like this,” he said. “I don’t know if we’ll be able to get home tonight.”

Television footage showed a building on fire in the Odaiba district of Tokyo, although it was not immediately clear if the blaze was connected to the earthquake. Another fire was seen burning out of control at the at Cosmo oil refinery in Ichihara, in Chiba prefecture near Tokyo.

Water levels rose quickly in the coastal town of Miyako in Iwate prefecture, while vehicles, houses and buildings were swept away by the tsunami in Onahama city, Fukushima prefecture.

TV news presenters repeatedly warned people along the Pacific coast to head for higher ground.

The quake is one of several to have struck north-east Japan this week, including one of magnitude 7.3 on Wednesday.

In 1933, a magnitude 8.1 quake in the area killed more than 3,000 people. Last year fishing facilities were damaged by a tsunami caused by a strong quake in Chile.

Japan is one of the most seismically active countries in the world, accounting for about 20% of the world’s earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.


all donations will go to red cross to help the earthquake victims!

Feel good music! music that makes you feel good inside! find out more@smarterhiphop

                                    
                                        theres a lot of music out there and I heard almost all of it! but here today i wanted to discuss and talk about the kind of music that makes you feel good so good that you don’t want the song to end that type of music everyone enjoys listening too its not just hiphop! it not just rock its not just pop it all kinds of musical hits out there from all different types of genres of music that make you feel loved,sexy,excitement,joy and peace here we are going to list some music that makes our staff  here love very much and we wanted to share with our viewers a  from all different kind of  genres! if you think you got a a song that make you feel good that you would like tho share with smarterhiphop then feel free to our email smarterhiphop@gmail.com it to us we will post it!

this album is one of my staffs favorite she plays in the car as she drives to work everyday she said its makes her feel like a star!

this album is from another staff member here he said he love this album because it helps him relax after a hard day at work!

this next album is my uncle favorite he loves this cd because it helps he relax! his favorite song on here it john doe!

Search Amazon.com for flo rida

wtf?:U.S. Government Eliminating $1 Bills to save billions! findout @smarterhiphop

Washington has come down with a case of fiscal fever as the Obama administration proposes everything from spending freezes on domestic programs to selling off unused government property to bring the budget back in line. Now, one study argues that the government can save billions of dollars simply by making a change to the currency itself.

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Earlier this month, the U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a formal proposal to the Treasury and Federal Reserve noting that if it eliminated the $1 bill and replaced it with the $1 coin, the country could save roughly $5.5 billion during the next 30 years. The reason, according to the agency’s report, is that dollar bills have a shorter lifespan than dollar coins because they wear much faster, which in turn requires the government to spend more to print new bills.

The GAO estimates that phasing out dollar bills in favor of coins would require a four-year transition period, during which the government invests in the new currency, but following that, the government would save an expected $522 million each year from the change.

Unfortunately, as the GAO notes, there is one problem with the plan: When given a choice between dollar coins and dollar bills, Americans always choose bills.

“GAO has noted in past reports that efforts to increase the circulation and public acceptance of the $1 coin have not succeeded, in part, because the $1 note has remained in circulation,” the agency wrote in its report. So if we are ever going to make the switch to dollar coins, as other countries like Canada have done, the GAO suggests the only way to do so is to phase dollar bills out of circulation altogether.

Before you start hoarding your dollar bills though, keep in mind that the GAO has made similar proposals four times during the past two decades, and obviously dollar bills are still in circulation. The only difference this time is that the overall climate in Washington is more geared toward budget cutbacks now, but given that it would take several years for the savings to kick in, this seems unlikely as well.

Still, we’d like to pose the question to readers. Would you be willing to eliminate dollar bills and switch to coins if it meant improving the country’s balance sheet?

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